Sticky Post – Read this first. Categories and Links in Mathemafrica

The navigability of Mathemafrica isn’t ideal, so I have created this post which might guide you to what you are looking for. Here are a number of different categories of post which you might like to take a look at:

Always write in a comment if there is anything you would like to see us write about, or you would like to write about.…

By | January 17th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Deborah Kent (Drake University) Omar Khayyam’s Geometrical Solution of the Cubic: An Example of Using History in the Teaching of Mathematics

Second talk at the Diversifying the curriculum conference in Oxford.

The following was taken down live, and as such there may be mistakes and misquotes. It is mostly a way for me to keep notes and to share useful resources and thoughts with others. As such, nothing should be used to quote the speaker from this article

From https://www.drake.edu/math/faculty/deborahkent/

From https://www.drake.edu/math/faculty/deborahkent/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to generate interesting conversations with students surrounding mathematical diversity.

Historical figures (From wikipedia):

Omar Khayyam 18 May 1048 – 4 December 1131) was a Persian mathematician, astronomer, and poet. He was born in Nishapur, in northeastern Iran, and spent most of his life near the court of the Karakhanid and Seljuq rulers in the period which witnessed the First Crusade.

As a mathematician, he is most notable for his work on the classification and solution of cubic equations, where he provided geometric solutions by the intersection of conics.

June Barrow-Green (The Open University) Towards a diversity resource for undergraduate mathematics

First talk at the Diversifying the curriculum conference in Oxford.

The following was taken down live, and as such there may be mistakes and misquotes. It is mostly a way for me to keep notes and to share useful resources and thoughts with others. As such, nothing should be used to quote the speaker from this article

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_Barrow-Green

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_Barrow-Green

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When reading through the Open University’s textbook “Pure Mathematics M208”, in the historical margin notes, the only female mathematician was Emmy Noether. The vast majority of characters were white European men.

The question is how do we create a resource which can tackle issues of diversity in mathematics? This is a recent project begun by June Barrow Green.

It is important to avoid tokenism when thinking about diversity.

Athena Swan – ECU Gender charter – a very useful resource for statistics about women in STEM

What do we mean by diversity: Ethnicity, gender, culture/ Images of mathematicians, who are the students?…

By | June 18th, 2019|Conference, Diversifying the curriculum|0 Comments

Learn Wolfram Mathematica in the Cloud Part 6

Today we delve into Associations aka Dictionaries in languages like Python

By | May 24th, 2019|Level: Simple, Mathematica|0 Comments

Learn Wolfram Mathematica in the Cloud part 5

Let’s do some list FU, a kind of Kung Fu with Wolfram language lists

By | May 22nd, 2019|Level: Simple, Mathematica, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Wolfram Language, the Language of Mathematica is now Free!

The language that powers Mathematica is now available for free! Head here or here to read more about this new release. Or go straight to the download page to start tinkering with it.…

By | May 22nd, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Learn Wolfram Mathematica in the cloud part 4

Diving deeper into lists

By | May 16th, 2019|Level: Simple, Mathematica|0 Comments

Learn Wolfram Mathematica in the cloud part 3

Dipping into Lists

By | May 14th, 2019|Level: Simple, Mathematica, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Learn Wolfram Mathamatica Part 2

Today we see how to use Wolfram language as a Calculator using the Notebook environment

By | May 10th, 2019|Level: Simple, Mathematica|0 Comments

Introduction to Wolfram Mathematica programming

Mathematica is becoming an indispensable tool for doing all kinds of computation and it is important to know how to use it as it will leverage your problem-solving skills, allowing you focus on higher level issues of modelling solutions rather than focusing too much on calculational details.

I will be posting short lessons regularly and the good news is you don’t need to install anything locally as all examples can be run online. If you need to do any form of extensive programming you can always go to the Wolfram Cloud and click on Programming Lab and get access for free.

Instructions on running code

If you don’t have a Wolfram ID, create one as this will give you access to the Wolfram Cloud. After you have done this sign in. If you have one then simply sign into the Wolfram Cloud.

If you have downloaded the notebook file from the blog and saved it somewhere then do the following to upload it to the cloud so you can play with the code.…

By | May 9th, 2019|Level: Simple, Mathematica|0 Comments

Relativity, The Special and General Theory, 100th anniversary edition – by Albert Einstein

NB. I was sent this book as a review copy.

In 1917, two years after publishing his work on The General Theory of Relativity, Einstein published a popular science account of both The Special, and General Theories of relativity. It is with some embarrassment that I have to admit that I’d never read this before, despite taking a number of undergraduate and postgraduate courses in relativity. Einstein understood the importance that his results had on our understanding of the universe, but also that the profundity of them could not truly be grasped by the general public, despite the headlines which covered many newspapers around the world on his results, without a popular exposition. 1917 was the publication of the first edition of this explication, but he continued to update them up until 1954. This allowed him to extend the theoretical discussion with the experimental verifications and discoveries which occurred over the next decades, including that of the expanding cosmology, spearheaded by Hubble’s observations.…

By | April 19th, 2019|Book reviews, Reviews|0 Comments